Fig Tree Top Report

Education and research in a sustainable and peaceful community-Monteverde, Costa Rica/ Educación e investigación en una comunidad sostenible y pacífica en Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Monteverde Institute - Instituto Monteverde Main website: http://monteverde-institute.org ------- And we are on FACEBOOK

Research on climate change in the treetops of the Tropical Montane Cloud Forest - Investigación sobre el cambio climático en la cima de los árboles del bosque tropical montano.

English (Para español favor de bajar).

RESEARCH ON CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE TREETOPS OF THE TROPICAL MONTANE CLOUD FOREST

By: Dr. Sybil Gotsch

The epiphyte community in this region is both abundant and diverse. This community is comprised of approximately 800 species of vascular plants in addition to many species of mosses and other bryophytes. The image above highlights many of the different life forms common in the canopy, from woody shrubs and treelets (lower right) to small orchids (center) and mosses (lower left). Photo Credit: Sybil Gotsch

Our research program is focused on understanding how epiphytes, non-parasitic plants that live on other plants (e.g. bromeliads and orchids but also many species of shrubs and other woody plants), are affected by drought and will be affected by projected changes in climate. These plants are important to the ecosystem in a number ways. Epiphytes capture, store and cycle water that collects on their leaves, they supply nutrients to the forest and provide food and habitat to hundreds of other species (Figure 1). These important plants are one of the reasons the TMCF is so lush and teeming with life. Unfortunately, this iconic community is vulnerable to changes in climate. Most epiphytes lack roots that reach the ground; these plants are mostly unable to tap into water and nutrients in soil making them dependent on inputs of water and nutrients from the atmosphere. While clouds are a ubiquitous feature of the TMCF, the elevation at which the clouds pass over the mountains is rising so contact between the clouds and the treetop epiphyte community might decrease which may cause stress to the plants and a ripple effect throughout the ecosystem. 

Figure 1. Ecosystem roles of the epiphyte community (or epiphytic materials, labeled EM in the figure) and the hypothesized reduction in ecosystem services due to a loss of epiphytes. Water and nutrient deposition (1), water cycling and nutrient retention (2) and food resources and habitat are all reduced in the absence of epiphytes. Decreases in interception and cycling due to a loss of epiphytes will lead to an increase in stem flow (4, right) and throughfall (5, right) in disturbed epiphyte communities and eventually lead to increases in surface run-off. (6, right) These changes in ecosystem function can have large-scale impacts on the tropical montane cloud forest ecosystem. Taken from Gotsch, Amici and Nadkarni 2016. Image Credit: F. Van Osch.

Since 2012, my students and I have been working on the physiology and ecology of epiphytes in the Monteverde region. When we started this project, we realized that much was still unknown about the form and function of these unique plants and so we started there. In the first couple of years we focused on some basic biology questions: What are some of the different strategies employed by epiphytes to withstand their unique environment? Can epiphytes directly absorb cloud water into their leaves as a way to reduce water stress? What microclimatic conditions drive patterns of water movement in epiphytes?

My students, collaborators and I have published one manuscript documenting our findings and a second is in review. We have found that this community relies heavily on clouds for their functioning. During a six-month period in 2014, we found that our study species conducted foliar water uptake 30% of the time. This is a process whereby plants absorb water from the atmosphere into their leaves. This process may aid plants in replenishing water lost during dry periods. In addition, we have found that the most important microclimatic driver of water movement in these plants is habitat moisture. These plants transpire more and replenish their internal stores of water more during wet periods. This is surprising since transpiration is generally thought to be driven by solar radiation or evaporative demand. In this community, epiphytes quickly shut down transpiration during dry periods in an attempt to hold on to stored water. While this water retention strategy has enabled these plants to withstand the variable TMCF canopy environment, there is a trade-off to this behavior. Solar radiation triggers the opening of stomata (pores) on the leaves, which allows carbon dioxide to enter the leaf and be converted into food (sugars) for the plant. If these stomates are closed to prevent water loss, a by product of that behavior is that food production will also be limited which may limit many other processes including growth, reproduction and the production of defense compounds.

Usually my students and I are here from May to August when classes are not in session. This year, though, I am on Junior Faculty Leave (a kind of sabbatical for untenured faculty) from Franklin and Marshall College and my team and I are here all year! We are taking advantage of this opportunity to conduct research in the dry season, something rarely possible for us. In December, we started a drought experiment in two greenhouses: one near the lab at the Monteverde Reserve and another on MVI property near the entrance to Curi Cancha. In these greenhouses we have epiphytes from upper and lower elevation sites. We are conducting a series of drought experiments throughout the dry season to see which communities (upper vs. lower elevation) of epiphytes are more vulnerable to the stress and which species are most resilient.  In addition, we have installed and are now maintaining six transpiration stations throughout the region to the study the effect of microclimate on water movement through these plants in the dry season. We have two stations in the Monteverde Reserve, two in Curi Cancha, and two at the University of Georgia Field station in San Luis.

If you would like more information about the research we are conducting, please see the Gotsch Lab Website: www.sybilgotsch.com or stop by when you see us in the greenhouses or on the trails!

The 2016 dry season field team. Upper Left: Jess Murray and Andrew Glunk measure water potential of epiphyte leaves that were collected in the canopy and lowered to the ground. This measure gives us a sense of water use and water stress in canopy plants. Lower left: Keylor Muñoz, and Lex Darby install a transpiration station in the Curi Cancha Reserve to study water cycling in this lower elevation forest where cloud inundation is less frequent than in the Monteverde Reserve. Right: Sybil Gotsch finishes the installation of a transpiration station in the University of Georgia Field Station forest, which is our driest research site. Photo credits: Sybil Gotsch and Keylor Muñoz.

The 2016 dry season field team. Upper Left: Jess Murray and Andrew Glunk measure water potential of epiphyte leaves that were collected in the canopy and lowered to the ground. This measure gives us a sense of water use and water stress in canopy plants. Lower left: Keylor Muñoz, and Lex Darby install a transpiration station in the Curi Cancha Reserve to study water cycling in this lower elevation forest where cloud inundation is less frequent than in the Monteverde Reserve. Right: Sybil Gotsch finishes the installation of a transpiration station in the University of Georgia Field Station forest, which is our driest research site. Photo credits: Sybil Gotsch and Keylor Muñoz.

Dr. Sybil Gotsch is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, PA. Sybil is a tropical plant ecophysiologist. Ecophysiology is a field concerned with the form and function of organisms in relation to their external environment. Sybil studies the Tropical Montane Cloud Forest canopy community and is in particular interested in understanding how canopy plants (epiphytes) are affected by seasonal drought as well as changes in cloud base heights and precipitation. 

Investigación sobre el cambio climático en la cima de los árboles del bosque tropical montano.

Por: Dr. Sybil Gotsch

La comunidad epífita en esta región es ambas cosas: abundante y diversa. La comunidad está compuesta por aproximadamente 800 especies de plantas vasculares además de muchas otras especies de musgo y otras briofitas. La siguiente imagen ilustra muchas de las diferentes formas de vida que son comunes en el dosel, desde arbustos leñosos y árboles pequeños (en la derecha inferior) a orquídeas pequeñas (centro) y musgos (izquierda inferior). Crédito fotográfico: Sybil Gotsch.  

Nuestro programa de investigación está enfocado en entender cómo una comunidad importante de plantas del bosque nuboso tropical montano (BNTM), las epífitas, son afectadas por sequía y cómo serán afectadas por el cambio climático. Las epífitas son plantas no-parásitas que viven en otras plantas (ej. bromelias y orquídeas pero también pueden ser arbustos y otras plantas leñosas). Estas plantas son importantes para nuestro ecosistema por varias razones. Las epífitas capturan, guardan, y circulan agua que se colecta en sus hojas, suplen de nutrientes al bosque, y proveen de alimento y hábitat a cientos de otras especies (figura 1). Estas plantas importantes son una de las razones por la cual el BNTM es tan exuberante y lleno de vida. Desgraciadamente, esta comunidad icónica es vulnerable a los cambios de clima. La mayoría de las epífitas carecen de raíces que lleguen hasta el suelo; estas plantas son incapaces de alcanzar agua y nutrientes del suelo, haciéndolas dependientes de el agua y nutrientes provenientes de la atmósfera.  Mientras que las nubes son una característica ubicua del BNTM, la altura base de las nubes está subiendo, así que el contacto entre las nubes y la comunidad epífita de la cima de los árboles puede disminuir y a la vez este puede causar estrés sobre las plantas y producir un efecto domino a través del ecosistema. 

Figura 1.Roles eco-sistemáticos de la comunidad epífita (o materiales epífitas, denominado ME en la figura) y la reducción hipotética en servicios eco-sistemáticos debido a la pérdida de epífitas. Disposición de agua y nutrientes (1), ciclo del agua y nutrientes (2) y recursos de agua y hábitat van a ser todos reducidos en la ausencia de epífitas. Disminución en la intercepción y el ciclismo debido a una pérdida de epífitas llevará a un aumento en el flujo de tallo (4, derecha) y escurrimiento (5, derecha) en comunidades epífitas perturbadas y que eventualmente llevará a un aumento de escorrentía superficial. (6, derecha). Estos cambios en las funciones eco-sistemáticas pueden tener impactos a gran escala en el ecosistema del bosque nuboso tropical montano. Tomado de Gotsch, Amici y Nadkarni, 2016. Crédito de imagen: F. Van Osch (traducido para este artículo).

Desde el 2012, mis estudiantes y yo hemos estado trabajando en la fisiología y la ecología de las epífitas en la región de Monteverde. Cuando comenzamos con este proyecto, nos dimos cuenta que mucho era aún desconocido sobre la forma y función de estás plantas únicas y por lo tanto comenzamos por ahí. En los primeros años nos enfocamos en unas preguntas biológicas básicas: ¿Cuáles son algunas de las diferentes estrategias utilizadas por las epífitas para soportar su ambiente único? ¿Pueden las epífitas absorber agua de nubes directamente como una manera de reducir estrés hídrico? ¿Cuáles condiciones microclimáticas dirigen los patrones de movimiento de agua en la epífitas?

Mis estudiantes, colaboradores y yo hemos publicado un artículo documentando nuestros hallazgos y tenemos un segundo articulo más en revisión. Hemos encontrado que esta comunidad depende en gran medida en las nubes para su funcionamiento. Durante un periodo de 6 meses en el 2014 encontramos que nuestra especie de estudio realizaba absorción de agua foliar solo el 30% de el tiempo. Este es un proceso mediante el cual las plantas absorben agua de la atmósfera por sus hojas. Este proceso puede ayudar a las plantas a reponer el agua perdida durante periodos de sequía. Adicionalmente, hemos encontrado que el dirigente micro-climático más importante en estas plantas es la humedad del hábitat. Estas plantas transpiran más y reponen sus reservas de agua más durante los periodos más húmedos. Esto es sorprendente ya que habitualmente se considera que la transpiración es provocada por radiación solar o demanda de evaporación. En esta comunidad, las epífitas detienen la transpiración rápidamente durante periodos secos con el fin de retener agua. Mientras que esta estrategia para retener agua ha permitido a estas plantas suportar la variabilidad de la vida sobre el dosel, existen desventajas a esta característica. La radiación solar causa el abrir de los estomas (poros) en la hojas, los cuales permiten que el dióxido de carbono entre a las hojas y sea convertido en alimento (azucares) para la planta. Si estos estomas se cierran para evitar la pérdida de agua, una consecuencia de ese comportamiento es que la producción de alimento también será limitada, lo cuál podría limitar otros procesos como el crecimiento, reproducción y la producción de componentes de defensa.  

Habitualmente mis estudiantes y yo estamos aquí de mayo a agosto cuando las clases no están en sesión. Este año, sin embargo, ¡tome un tiempo sabático (Junior Faculty Leave) de Franklin and Marshall College y mi equipo y yo estaremos aquí todo el año! Estamos aprovechando esta oportunidad para elaborar investigación en la época seca, algo que es pocas veces una oportunidad para nosotros. En diciembre comenzamos un experimento de sequía en dos viveros: uno cerca del laboratorio en la Reserva Monteverde y la otra en la propiedad del Instituto Monteverde cerca de la entrada de Curi Cancha. En estos viveros tenemos epífitas provenientes de lugares de elevaciones altas y bajas. Estamos haciendo una serie de experimentos a través de la estación seca para ver cuales de las comunidades de epífitas (de elevación alta vs. elevación baja) son más susceptibles a estrés y cuales son los más resilientes. Adicionalmente, hemos instalado y actualmente mantenemos seis estaciones a través de la región para estudiar el ciclo del agua en epífitas comunes residentes de diferentes microclimas. Tenemos dos estaciones en la Reserva Monteverde, dos en Curi Cancha, y dos en la estación de campo de la Universidad de Georgia en San Luis.

Si le gustaría tener más información sobre la investigación que Sybil y su equipo están haciendo, por favor visite la página web del laboratorio Gotsch: www.sybilgotsch.com o pasen a vernos cuando nos vean en los viveros o en los senderos.  

El equipo de campo de la estación seca, 2016/ Izquierda superior: Jess Murray y Andrew Glunk midiendo el potencial hídrico de las hojas de las epífitas que fueron recolectados en el dosel y luego llevadas al suelo. Esta medición nos da una idea del uso del agua y el estrés de agua en plantas de dosel. Izquierda inferior: Keylor Muñoz y Lex Darby instalan una estación de transpiración en la Reserva Curi Cancha para estudiar el ciclo de agua en este bosque de elevación baja donde la inundación de nubes es menos frecuente que en la Reserva Monteverde. A la derecha: Sybil Gotsch termina la instalación de una estación de transpiración en el bosque de la estación de campo de la Universidad de Georgia, la cual es nuestra estación de investigación más seca. Créditos de fotos: Sybil Gotsch y Keylor Muñoz

El equipo de campo de la estación seca, 2016/ Izquierda superior: Jess Murray y Andrew Glunk midiendo el potencial hídrico de las hojas de las epífitas que fueron recolectados en el dosel y luego llevadas al suelo. Esta medición nos da una idea del uso del agua y el estrés de agua en plantas de dosel. Izquierda inferior: Keylor Muñoz y Lex Darby instalan una estación de transpiración en la Reserva Curi Cancha para estudiar el ciclo de agua en este bosque de elevación baja donde la inundación de nubes es menos frecuente que en la Reserva Monteverde. A la derecha: Sybil Gotsch termina la instalación de una estación de transpiración en el bosque de la estación de campo de la Universidad de Georgia, la cual es nuestra estación de investigación más seca. Créditos de fotos: Sybil Gotsch y Keylor Muñoz

Sobre la autora:

La Dr. Sybil Gotsch es una profesora asistente en la Universidad de Franklin y Marshall College en Lancaster, Pensilvania. Sybil es una ecofisióloga de plantas tropicales. Ecofisiología es un campo que trata con la forma y funcionalidad de organismos en relación con su entorno externo. Sybil estudia en el dosel de la comunidad del boque tropical nubosos montano y tiene un interés particular en entender como las plantas de dosel (epífitas) son afectadas por sequías estacionarias así como cambios en la base de la altura de las nubes y precipitación.